Author Archives: Green Alliance blog

How understanding values creates better conversations on climate change

SME smallThis post is by Sam Hampton of the Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford

There are nearly six million small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the UK, including a wide variety of business types, ranging from fairly large manufacturing companies to small family firms, social enterprises and micro-businesses. Altogether their energy use produces enormous quantities of carbon emissions. Read more

Out of the mouths of babes: Greta Thunberg and being ‘naïve’ on climate

gretathunberg_viaflickr_prachataiThis post is by Green Alliance associate Dr Rebecca Willis. It first appeared on her blog.

I can’t stop thinking about sixteen year old Greta Thunberg, speaking with quiet determination to rooms full of powerful people in Davos.

I think that Thunberg has an incredible gift. She summarises, with simplicity and eloquence, what climate scientists have been telling us for a long time: that climate change threatens our future on this planet; and that drastic cuts to emissions are needed, starting now. Read more

Natural England’s role will be essential post-Brexit

jurassic coast_chris parker via flickrThis post is by Andrew Sells, the outgoing chair of Natural England.

Natural England is an organisation that some thought – at various stages – was as endangered as some of the species we strive to protect. But as it prepares for life after the UK’s departure from the European Union, it has never been more important.

With my time at the helm now drawing to a close, I would like to take this opportunity to reflect on five years as chair of Natural England and the future for conservation. Read more

Why a ‘no deal’ Brexit increases risks to the environment

air pollution smallThis post is written by Martin Harper, global conservation director at RSPB. It was first posted on his blog

Following the comprehensive rejection this week of the prime minister’s proposed Withdrawal Agreement by the UK parliament, and without stronger assurances which would avoid a disorderly Brexit, the risk of leaving the European Union on 29 March without a deal remains.

As politicians scrabble around to work out what happens next, I want to outline why the RSPB, and many other environmental NGOs, believe that ‘no deal’ would be such bad news for the nature. Read more

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