Tag Archives: food waste

It’s time to link food, nature and climate policy

This post is by Jessica Sinclair-Taylor, head of policy and media at Feedback.

A recent letter, organised by Nourish Scotland and signed by a number of organisations (including Feedback) and city governments, has asked COP26 President Alok Sharma to clear some space for food system debates on the agenda at the Glasgow climate summit this year. As the letter points out, the intimate links between nature, cutting and storing carbon, and food production, are not receiving the attention they deserve.

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Could digital tech cut food waste and tell us more about where our food comes from?

intext-van-foodAlong with the natural ecosystems that underpin it, our food system is a complex web of parts working to grow, manufacture and deliver food all over the world. In a previous blog I looked at the potential of digital technologies to link up these different parts to redirect surplus food and avoid waste. But could they also improve communication throughout the supply chain to prevent waste occurring in the first place? Read more

Will the pandemic mean we finally end the food waste scandal?

Food waste from domestic kitchen Responsible disposal of househoOur highly globalised, just in time food supply chain has come under considerable scrutiny since the coronavirus pandemic pushed the system to its limits. The shock of seeing empty shelves in a modern, wealthy, westernised country has led many to question the resilience of the UK’s food system. We can expect this topic to be debated long after the immediate crisis is over, when we begin to (hopefully) build back better. Read more

Don’t give up on voluntary agreements for food waste

This is a guest post by Julie Hill, author of The Secret Life of Stuff, and a Green Alliance associate.

The news that the companies signed up to WRAP’s Courtauld Commitment are seriously off track for meeting their target for reducing food waste in their supply chains (only 0.4 per cent reduction against a target of five per cent by end of 2012) will doubtless be seized upon by opponents of  ‘voluntary agreements’.  Read more