Tag Archives: house building

How to build houses and save the countryside

Urban housing in the south of EnglandThere was much to admire in the prime minister’s recent speech on housing. Theresa May called homelessness in our rich country “a source of national shame” and she is right. She pledged to increase house building, but to do so without “destroying the country we love”. And she attacked big developers for gaming the system and putting dividends and executive pay before building more homes. As I read the speech, I mentally ticked off many of the arguments I have made in How to build houses and save the countryside. Read more

What the government should do with the housing white paper

Newly built homesThis post is by Shaun Spiers, chief executive of CPRE. It first appeared on CPRE’s blog.

There will be much to welcome in this month’s housing white paper. We expect a big emphasis on brownfield development and more support to enable local authority planning departments to do their job. Best of all, it looks set to address the main cause of the housing shortage: not planning or a lack of land, but the system’s over dependence on a dozen big companies to deliver the new homes the country needs. Read more

Housing and planning bill shows national policy making is still short sighted

Sandbags Outside Front Door Of Flooded HouseThis post is by Richard Benwell, head of government affairs at the Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust.

The Greener London report, published last week, is an excellent menu of options for making our capital cleaner, safer and more biodiverse. And, at the Greener London hustings on Friday, we saw mayoral candidates vie with one another over a wide selection of ideas, and over who would commit to finish them faster: Read more

The case for urbanism: reminding Labour what it stood for

New_House_BuildingThis post is by Shaun Spiers, chief executive of the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE). It is a version of a post featured on CPRE’s blog.

Good ideas can lose political currency for no good reason.  For example, the government has simply chosen to ignore the evidence that building new roads is not the solution to congestion.  A long-standing political and academic consensus has been abandoned without explanation.  Perhaps the government just got bored of the evidence. Read more