Tag Archives: Andy Jordan

After the Brexit vote: what next for the UK’s environment?

Westminster securityThis post is by Andy Jordan, Charlotte Burns and Viviane Gravey.  They recently co-led an expert review of the environmental implications of Brexit funded by the UK in a Changing Europe Initiative.

After a deeply divisive campaign, UK voters have opted by a small majority to leave the European Union.  Environmentalists are accustomed to most policy being made jointly with the EU. The shock result flips that assumption completely on its head. The referendum process may be over, but the hard political debate over policy starts now. Read more

A tale of two policy areas: why EU-UK environmental relations are more complicated than you think


housingThis post is by Viviane Gravey and Andy Jordan of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research at UEA.  They recently co-led an expert
review of the environmental implications of Brexit funded by the UK in a Changing Europe Initiative.

Although the environment as has not yet become a central focus of debate between the two official campaigns, particular issues, like the state of the UK’s beaches and climate change, are getting an airing. Read more

Is environment the biggest hole in the referendum campaigns?

Missing puzzel in green color. Selective focusThis post is by Andy Jordan and Viviane Gravey of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research.  They recently co-led an expert review of the environmental implications of Brexit funded by the UK in a Changing Europe Initiative.

Last week’s statement by a cross party group of environmental politicians was important, less for what it contained and more for what was behind it.  Launched with the backing of Britain Stronger in Europe, it marked the first attempt by either of the two official referendum campaigns to capture the environmental vote.  Having seized the initiative, the eyes of the environmental movement are now on Vote Leave to see how – and, indeed, if – it responds. Read more

Now is the time to debate the international climate policy target

Atmospheric wooden thermometerThis post is by Andy Jordan and Tim Rayner of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research based at the University of East Anglia

When the Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP) convened for the nineteenth time in Warsaw, how many participants doubted the world’s capacity to fulfill the Convention’s ultimate objective of avoiding ‘dangerous climate change’? Probably many more than were willing to admit it in public. Read more