Tag Archives: EU 2030 climate

David Cameron’s EU performance tomorrow is more important to the UK’s future than the Budget

Prime_Minister_David_Cameron,_speaking_GAVI_Alliance_cropThis post was written with Nick Mabey, chief executive of E3G. It first appeared on BusinessGreen.

Who says politics is short term? Tomorrow David Cameron and Europe’s other premiers will debate the shape of the region’s economy in 2030. They’ll do so through the lens of climate and energy policy, in a rerun of the historic decision they took six years ago to commit to a 2020 carbon target, which continues to drive investment and innovation in the transport, power and building sectors. Read more

Why the UK shouldn’t go it alone: the benefits of a common European energy and climate policy

FlagThis post is by Jonathan Gaventa, programme leader on European energy infrastructure at E3G. Jonathan is one of 20 experts Green Alliance interviewed as part of a review of European climate and energy policy which will be published next week.

There is no security in separatism, no innovation in isolationism, and nothing to be gained from walking away from our seat at the European table. Read more

Why have Tory MEPs rejected a free market solution to climate change?

KraftwerkThis article was first published by The New Statesman.

It may surprise some on the centre left but there is nothing innate to Conservatism that makes it less able to take pragmatic decisions in favour of sensible environmental policy. It has had a refreshing ability to acknowledge the intrinsic value of nature and stewardship even if it has become more conflicted about the means to deliver these outcomes. It is a broad church that spans from the one nation Heseltines to the radical free marketeers like John Redwood. But, if there is one thing that unites them, it’s the belief that markets offer most of the answers. Read more

Three green politics predictions for 2013

cAnticipating significant trends is a compulsive but risky habit. Last year I forecasted three, and whilst two did come good, one was spectacularly wrong.  The Conservative Party did not follow a centrist strategy and did not reassert its support for a green economy. The challenge to the UK’s low carbon leadership which this reflects makes prediction harder than usual but, undaunted, I offer three more for the coming year: Read more